How to Create a Simple Python WebSocket Server Using Tornado

With the increase in popularity of real-time web applications, WebSockets have become a key technology in their implementation. The days where you had to constantly press the reload button to receive updates from the server are long gone. Web applications that want to provide real-time updates no longer have to poll the server for changes - instead, servers push changes down the stream as they happen. Robust web frameworks have begun supporting WebSockets out of the box. Ruby on Rails 5, for example, took it even further and added support for action cables.

In the world of Python, many popular web frameworks exist. Frameworks such as Django provide nearly everything necessary to build web applications, and anything that it lacks can be made up with one of the thousands of plugins available for Django. However, due to the way Python or most of its web frameworks work, handling long lived connections can quickly become a nightmare. The threaded model and global interpreter lock are often considered to be the achilles heel of Python.

But all of that has started to change. With certain new features of Python 3 and frameworks that already exist for Python, such as Tornado, handling long lived connections is a challenge no more. Tornado provides web server capabilities in Python that is specifically useful in handling long-lived connections.

 
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